Tag Archives: Sushi

Uobei Genki Sushi

If you are looking for conveyor belt sushi close to base, Uobei Genki Sushi is a great family friendly spot to check out.  About a 10 minute drive out the East Gate, it is located right next to Joyful Honda.  Upon entry there is a computer stand where you enter the amount in your party (English option available) and receive a number to wait for your table.  We went at 6:00pm on a weeknight and had no wait.  Our number showed up on the television and directed us to a table number.  Once seated you can review the menu next to the table or on the ipad provided at the table.  When ready to order you make your selections on the pad.  A short time later dishes will be delivered via bullet train or race car which the kids loved.  My husband enjoyed a variety of sushi, while the kids and I stuck with the chicken and french fries.  I did try some shrimp tempura rolls which were my favorite so far of any sushi spots we have checked out.  The kids finished dinner off with blue icecream on top of corn flakes.  Once you are done with dinner you make a selection on the pad then take your table marker to the front to check out.  All sushi dishes are ¥100. We are a family of 4 and spent about ¥3500 for dinner.  Uobei Genki Sushi is a chain but of all the conveyor belt sushi locations we have tried I found I liked the atmosphere of this one the best.  This would also be a great spot to take visiting friends and family for a sushi experience. – Angela Vaillant, September 2018

You can access the sushi and autumn fair menu on their web-site.

Web-site: https://www.genkisushi.co.jp/en/

Sushi-chu

2013-12-08 14.35.18There is Japanese food and Japanese cuisine…Sushi-chu offers the latter – to the maximum delicious degree. Prices are reasonable, the staff is learning English to serve their customers, and the atmosphere is cozy and relaxing. You can order from their set menu, or create your own experience by ordering a la carte. The restaurant is family-run and family-friendly (kids can even roll their own sushi). Sushi-chu delivers on taste, freshness, presentation – and most importantly, a welcoming staff.2013-12-08 15.03.31

2013-12-08 16.02.37Arrive with cash (yen) and park next to the building on the West side. You can even reserve special tatami rooms to dine in. This would be a great place to take visitors for an authentic Japanese experience. Pictures, Jamie Cowan, July 2015

DIRECTIONS:This restaurant is about 20 minutes away from base, in Hachioji.

Phone number: 042-691-0230

Coordinates: 35.708078, 139.295207

Website: http://www.sushi-chu.com/pg9.html

Tripadvisor: http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g1060898-d6656894-r290066255-Tobuki_Sushichu-Hachioji_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html#

Koenji – Second-hand shops and Street fashion

Harajuku is fabulous for the people-watching and accessory shops, but once you’ve been there, tried that, consider Koenji. This neighborhood, between Tachikawa and Shinjuku, is billed as the center of Tokyo’s alternative youth culture. Street fashion, vintage clothes and consignment shops abound here. It was largely untouched by the bombs of World War II, so it’s also great for those who want to stroll through an older neighborhood of Tokyo. Some of the second-hand clothing shops are highly curated. One is devoted to the Little Red Ridinghood look, another to the cutsey-Alice-in-Wonderland look, and a third to the 1950s cowgirl vibe. Some specialize in high-end European clothes, some in embellished t-shirts. Unlike Shibuya and Harajuku, this area seems relaxed and more like a neighborhood than a commercial shopping area.
I explored the area to the south of the train station, specifically Pal Street and Look Street. Vintage stores and little shops line both sides of these streets. As evening falls, strings of red lanterns light up the side streets, luring thirsty shoppers to the many local izakaya (taverns) and specialty restaurants. I went on a weekday afternoon. Some shops were closed but the neighborhood still seemed open for business. I hear the best time to go is after 3pm on the weekend. Some of the trendy stores stay open until 10pm or later.
Next time, I intend to look at the north side of the tracks to find the Kita-Kore building, where pop star Lady Gaga shopped when she came to Japan in 2011. The building has five shops that the New York Times describes as  “equal parts used-clothing outlet and high-end recycling atelier.” Where else are we going to find fashionable body armor, or footwear that combines Nike uppers on traditional Japanese wooden sandals?

RESTAURANTS:

WE COULD USE DESCRIPTIONS HERE OF THE CUTE-LOOKING CAFE NOBLE AND TACOS CAFE. AMONG MANY OTHER PROMISING SPOTS.

Smart Sushi: This is a conveyor-belt sushi restaurant, but the better food arrives by special order. You use a touch-screen overhead to order, and the food comes shooting down the track at you, above the conveyor belt, on a wooden “boat.” Take your food and send the boat back by pressing the glowing red button. Food was standard sushi fare. Cheapest sushi order was ¥120. Near the top of the Pal street mall, a five-minute walk from Koenji station.
Planet 3rd: The decor at this Asia fusion eatery is like The Jetsons meets Sex in the City.  It’s cheerful and hip, with 1950s-style furnishings. For such a cool-looking restaurant, I was surprised to find the prices weren’t shocking. Examples: Thai-spiced chicken mince on rice, with lots of veggies, for ¥930.  Or beef stew with omelette for ¥1000. English menu, with pictures. 2-49-18 Koenji-Minami, Suginami-ku, GPS: 35.70192, 139.6496
TRAIN DIRECTIONS: From Fussa Station, take a train bound for Tokyo. Change trains in Tachikawa to get on the Chuo Line, heading for Tokyo. On a local service train, Koenji is 12 stops after Tachikawa. If you’re on an express train, change at Mitaka to a local Chuo Line train and go five more stops to Koenji. Alternatively, stay on your express train all the way to Nakano and backtrack one stop to Koenji. Total travel time: 50-60 minutes. It’s a short walk from the station to the shops of Pal and Look streets, Exit Koenji station by the south exit and turn right. Walk parallel to the tracks about 300 feet, toward the roof-covered street with a sign that reads “Pal.” Turn left on Pal and start browsing. If you keep going straight after the roof ends, you’ll be shopping on Look Street.

Liz Ruskin, Sept. 2011


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Screaming Sushi (Totoya Michi)

It is called “Screaming Sushi” among Yokotans because the sushi chefs boisterously welcome customers and sometimes make loud announcements of special dishes. It is the most popular place to go for revolving-belt sushi in Fussa. If seats are not available upon arrival, sign up at the new-fangled monitor for a table or counter seating (“countah” in Japanglish). Generous portions are priced between ¥126 and ¥577 per plate, plus miso soup refills are free at lunch. Chopsticks are in the oblong box and pickled ginger “gari” is in the square box. There are two types of powdered tea, brown hoji-cha and green matcha; put two spoonfuls in a cup and add hot water from the push lever spigot. Besides sushi (including California rolls, seared salmon, shrimp and avocado), there is fried chicken, rice paper spring rolls with shrimp and lettuce, shrimp tempura, fresh fruit, crepes and more. Orders from the menu (English with pictures) may also be placed with the chefs or waitresses. If a bell rings, a chef may be offering something special such as seared scallops, fresh tempura, or fresh fish to be fileted. Returning customers may ask for a point card eventually good for ¥600 off a meal.
DIRECTIONS: Go straight out the Fussa Gate (0km), veer right at the “Y” and turn right onto Yanagi Dori, aka the Seiyu street (0.7km, Fussa Sta. E. Ent. No.2 intersection). Keep straight (through approx. nine traffic lights) and the restaurant will be located on your right (2km), across from a Shell station. Hours: 11am-11pm, 042-539-1418. GPS: 35.75204, 139.3231  August, 2011.


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SushiRo

SushiRo1SushiRo5Added to Yokota Travel in 2002, this “conveyor belt” sushi restaurant is still quite popular for its low cost and variety. If you go, you may have to wait in line for a seat. If there is a line, you will need to get a number from the machine next to the host/hostess. It’s in Japanese, but somebody will be happy to help you.

SushiRo2SushiRo3Once seated, you can grab sushi from the conveyor belt, or you may special order. Each table has its own ordering screen, which the staff will kindly switch to English for you. Special orders arrive via the conveyor belt on an elevated red tray that it color coded for your table. The special order screen will play a brief tune a moment before your order arrives. The price is determined by the plate color. There’s a handy chart at each table. Yellow and white are only ¥105, one is with wasabi and one is without (not sure which one). Black square plates are special and a little more expensive, but usually delicious.

Water is self-serve and located on the entrance side of the restaurant. There are two water stations. Additionally, each table has a hot water spigot and a bowl of matcha (green powder) for making green tea. Other drinks are offered through the special order screen. When you are finished, call a waiter using the button with a bell printed on it; they’ll count your plates and give you a card to take to the register.

SushiRo is open from 11am to 11pm. However, the last opportunity to be seated is at 10:30 pm. GPS: 35.718544, 139.335772. Brian Marriott, August 2002, confirmed Chris Kopp, May 2013, updated Roxanne Ready, July 2013, photos Michelle Nexon, July 2013.


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