Category Archives: Tachikawa Restaurants

Ramen Square, Tachikawa

Ramen Square is a collection of seven ramen shops, combined on the third floor of a building in Tachikawa. When you step into the square, you feel like you are entering the streets of Manhattan. Each shop has a specialty ramen dish. Prices range from ¥500 to ¥1200. It’s open 11:00 to 24:00, last order is 23:30. Phone: 042-521-7111. Website: http://ramen-square.com/.

The Square is located south of the Tachikawa Station, near the Tachikawaminami Station. It’s on the third floor of the Arearea 2 building. It will be marked with green NYC style road signs. GPS: 35.6961514, 139.4128046. Michelle Nexon, July 2014.

Shravan Indian Restaurant

Shravan serves Indian cuisine prepared by 5 star hotel chefs. Located in Tachikawa, it’s a short 4 minute walk from the station, in the basement of a green building that’s easy to miss. But its customer service and cuisine are worth the trip.

photo 3For a starter, you can choose from a large variety of meats and vegetables, including tandoori chicken, fish and prawns. Once you have finished your starter, you can choose from a large selection of curries, including mixed vegetable, chicken masala, butter chicken, mutton, egg masala and more. Don’t forget your rice and/or naan. Pick from butter, cheese, garlic, sweet, sesame, tomato, etc. During lunch hours, you can order a set meal, which includes small salad, curry, naan or rice, and a drink. Sets are approximately ¥800 to ¥900.

To get there, walk out of Tachikawa Station’s South entrance. Head southeast. Please see the map below for more details, or use GPS coordinates to help find the way, 35.696000,139.415843. Shravan is open seven days a week, 11:00 to 15:00 and 17:00 to 23:00. Last order is 22:30. Visit their site for more information. http://www.shravan.jp/en/. Phone 042 526 1422. Michelle Nexon, April 2014.

 

Rose Hogs in Tachikawa

DSC_0067_1Rose Hogs is a great place to get an international beer very close to Tachikawa train station.  Directed here by a friend, my husband and I found ourselves at Rose Hogs during happy hour which lasts from 5:30pm-7:30pm.  They carry many international beers on tap from Belgium, Scotland, the USA…  Rather than a brewery, this is a pub serving traditional American pub fare: steak, hamburgers, fish and chips, and they have some great salad choices.  The Cobb salad was delicious!  The menu was in English and had pictures making it easy to navigate.  The best part for me was the beer from my home in Northern California!   They carry bottles from two Humboldt Country Breweries: North Coast Brewery and Mad River Brewery.  They also had a seasonal North Coast Watermelon Wheat on tap.  It was crazy good and reminded me of home.  During Obon, happy hour lasts from 5:30pm – 11pm.
rose hogs by sarah strausDIRECTIONS: From the Tachikawa train station, take the South Exit towards the three story McDonalds.  Go down the stairs near the McDonalds and head straight down that street passing McDonalds on your left.  About a half block down you’ll find a tall, narrow building that houses Rose Hogs on the 3rd floor.  This photo was taken from the elevated sidewalk right next to McDonalds and shows the sign for Rose Hogs, though it is hard to read in the photo.  Take the elevator up and enjoy! – Sarah Straus, August 2013

DSC_0064_1

Flatbreadz

Flatbreadz by RebekahFlatbreadz is a little restaurant directly beside Krispy Kreme in Tachikawa Station.  It is a fresh, FRESH, sandwich shop. The bread is made right in the line to order and the veggies are so fresh it is INSANE. It is sort of expensive, at  ¥700 per sandwich and up without a set, but it is worth it. They also have very simple but delicious side salads, fries and crispy chicken strips. They have mini muffin “cupcakes” for dessert, smoothies and lattes. Plus, you can take the buns home! I believe they are ¥150 – ¥300 each, but you can take them home and make amazing sandwiches yourself. It is a nice, relaxing place to munch after a long, stressful day in Tokyo and it’s always on the ride home! - Sierra, October 2012, photos by Rebekah Storman, May 2013.
flatbreadz by RebekahDirections: As you leave Tachikawa Station, go towards the North exit. Go down the stairs or elevator and you will see Krispy Kreme in all its lighted glory. Flatbreadz is just beside it.

photo(4)

 

“Communist Gyoza” in Tachikawa (Gyoza 1059)

This restaurant is known by Americans as “Communist Gyoza”  but its real name is Gyoza Ten-Go-Kyo, which means “Gyoza Heaven.” (Just to confuse things, the owners do a little bilingual word and number play and write it as “Gyoza 1059.”) Tucked away on a side street in Tachikawa, this hole in the wall makes the best gyoza around! Gyoza is a small dumpling (similar to a wonton) which is steamed and pan fried. The gyoza served here are HUGE, about the size of a fist.  Flavors include mushroom, vegetable, garlic, green onion, potato, cheese, corn and shrimp. Seating is limited. Each plate (five very large gyoza) averages ¥700. The restaurant has a policy requiring each person to order a gyoza plate (versus sharing an order) and a drink. You can order more drinks later, but you are forbidden to order any more plates after your initial order. This policy and its enforcement has given rise to the “Communist Gyoza” moniker. No matter, because one plate will be plenty for anyone. Just be warned that the garlic order is essentially like eating a handful of nearly raw garlic. Most people can’t handle it, but you’ll definitely be safe from vampires. The restaurant is colorful and deliciously worthwhile. If Japan had a Seinfeld series, this place would be in it. Because it’s so popular and seating limited, you might want to arrive when it opens at 5:30pm. Otherwise, you may have a long wait. But they do take reservations. Hours: 5:30-10pm  (last order 9:30 pm),  Tuesday-Saturday. Tel: 042-526-2283. GPS: 35.6977,139.4179

View Larger Map
DIRECTIONS: Exit Tachikawa Station from the Granduo side. Turn left and follow the road that borders the Granduo and the railroad tracks. Stay to the left when the road branches. When you see the pedestrian path heading under the railroad tracks to the left, keep your eyes on the right, trained on the small alleys. Turn right to go up the second small alley. Now look at the apartment buildings on your left. There will be a very small black and white sign for Gyoza 1059 at the entrance of the first one. Go up a few steps and enter the restaurant. 
Teresa Negley, Karen Ozment, Kerri Wright, 1996. Liz Ruskin updated 2010. Directions verified 2011.

Savini Italian Restaurant

After a day of shopping in Tachikawa, go to Savini for lunch or, better yet, for their “Imagination Cake.” This dessert is a light-tasting sponge cake with a generous amount of whipping cream, with small slices of kiwi, cantaloupe, and strawberries. It’s a delicious treat at ¥600 per hefty slice. Other desserts sounded equally scrumptious—baked pudding, chocolate mousse, homemade Italian ice cream, ricotta cheese cake, and fresh fruit (¥500-¥700). Lunch entrees include sirloin garlic steak, grilled lamb (¥1900-¥3500), goulash, veal or grilled chicken (¥1200). Sixteen choices of salad are available for ¥850 to ¥1250: spinach, seafood, tomato, green, octopus, bacon and shimeji, zucchini and eggplant, and crabmeat. Pizza in all combinations are offered: vegetarian, anchovy, shrimp, shorizo, pear, bacon, salmon, seafood, and seppie (squid ink). Pizzas with 19 or less items cost ¥1200 to ¥3900, depending on size. There is also a large selection of drinks. Open since 1968, this 30-seat restaurant fills up fast at lunch time with business women as well as women with bags filled with shopping bargains. There are English menus.

DIRECTIONS: Savini is located on the second floor of the Inoue Building. Take the train from Fussa to Tachikawa. Exit the station, walking past Lumine Dept Store, using the stairs on the left. Cross the street and go down the alley next to the Klimt Coffee Shop (pink awnings). Continue straight on this road and you’ll see the Savini sign. Hours: daily 11:00 am – 12:00 am. -Karen Ozment

 

Edo Ichi “Vikings”

NOTE: THE BRANCH THE DIRECTIONS LEAD TO RECENTLY CHANGED ITS NAME FROM VIKING TO NEO. STILL ALL YOU CAN EAT YAKINIKU AND SUSHI. 2012

This is a chain of all-you-can-eat restaurants where you cook your own food. When you enter, pay about ¥2500 (cheaper for children) per person and get a receipt. You will then be escorted to a table and your grill will be started. Put oil on the grill and head for the plates. There is a selection of sushi near the soda dispensers and rice, soup, and curry in large pots on both sides of the case where the plates are located. Go to the open refrigerated display cases and select as much of whatever food you want. There is a wide choice of meat, vegetables, gyoza, salads, fruit, and noodles. Take the plates to your table and grill your discoveries. For dessert, try cream puffs, chocolate pie, or ice cream. The ice cream is located in a separate case near the drink dispensers. One word of warning: Because many people are cooking, the room gets VERY smoky. Do not wear good clothes! I also take my contact lenses out. If you are tall, be careful not to hit your knees on the bottom of the grill because it is very hot! Try to go before the rush which is usually 6-7pm. Not only is the restaurant less crowded but so is the highway.

DIRECTIONS: Set your Odometer to zero and exit right out the East Gate and turn left at the first light (Inadaira Koen Minami intersection). At the next light (5 way intersection, 0.7 km.) Make a right hand turn (not a sharp right, but angled right towards Daiei). At 1.9 km bear right at the intersection, where this road merges with another (Family Mart on right Corner, Toyota dealer on left corner). Turn left at the second light onto Itsukaichi-Kaido Road (2.0 km, Tennobashi Intersection, just after you go under the tracks). Stay on this road until the light with Edo-Ichi Yakiniku all-you-can-eat Restaurant on the far right corner (3.5 km). The red sign reads “Sushi & Yakiniku Vikings.” Hours? Telephone?

Karen Ozmen. Liz Ruskin verified directions Sept. 2011